All posts for Tag: installation

Hylozoic Tools

Standing beneath the work of Philip Beesley Architect Inc., keeping your jaw closed and eyes on where you’re walking are tall orders. Delicate and yet aggressive structures of webs and skeletons ascend above you, colourful mixtures of wet chemicals swishing and condensing throughout. The experience is not unlike drifting through a coral reef, except that the reef floats above rather than unfurls below… kelp forests might be a better comparison. A diversity of strange forms abound, resembling creatures that would look at home in the ocean’s hyper-pressurized depths. The interplay between phyla and species makes it difficult at first to contextualize Beesley’s pieces in human terms, and yet they are decidedly technological… mechanical mutations thriving at the fringe of some emergent ecological niche.

Sargasso, on display during Luminato at Brookfield Place

After an afternoon spent at Sargasso (the architect’s most recent Canadian installation, and a highlight of the 2011 Luminato Festival) I had to learn more about the motivations behind this exciting new work, as well as the tools required to realize it. In a series of conversations with Philip Beesley and Rob Gorbet, one of the architect’s closest collaborators, I learned about both, as well as how innovative approaches to architecture and interactive storytelling might have more in common than I had presumed.

Philip Beesley’s work has parallel foundations in professional architecture and contemporary sculpture, and he sees the collision of these circles as a valuable foundation upon which to ask questions about the nature of interrelated systems. Rob Gorbet teaches electrical, computer, and mechanical engineering at the University of Waterloo; but one of his favourite educational efforts is a course pairing sculpture students with upper-year engineers to explore models for collaboration. Beesley and Gorbet’s collaboration is therefore not only an opportunity for artist to engage engineer; it’s an opportunity to compare strategies for sharing across disciplines, vocabularies, and metrics of success.

Sargasso, on display during Luminato at Brookfield Place

In our discussions, Gorbet referred to the “consultant versus collaborator” choice often presented to engineers working with artists. While he tends to begin his working relationships with artists as the former, he prefers the latter for its emphasis on “Why?” questions and mind-bending learning experiences. I’m in alignment – my personal experience has been that competition within silos or fields tends to encourage excellence, while collaboration between disciplines more often rewards interestingness. Beesley articulates his motivation for working with outsiders in a slightly different way – it’s an opportunity to ensure genuine incompletion, and to encourage disjunctive mutations within a suitably resilient environment. Whether in biology or collaborative creativity, productive mismatches can lead to amazing innovations.

The twitching and cascading Hylozoic series of installations have evolved through an iterative design and prototyping process into a fascinating diversity of forms. In order to realize their vision and keep up with a self-imposed evolutionary arms race of innovation, Beesley and Gorbet have had to design just as exotic an array of production tools. The materials used in the construction of the Hylozoic series, for instance, range from hyperbolic meshwork scaffolds to shape-memory alloy actuators; electrogalvanic bladders to components fabricated from biodegradable cellulose.

Rob Gorbet and Jonathan Lau working at Philip Beesley Architect Inc.

But the new tools being utilized to solve problems at PBAI aren’t all material. A sharp young engineer named Jonathan Lau is collaborating with Beesley and Gorbet on the development of a simulator that will capture data from the firm’s various physical installations; providing the opportunity to analyze specific behaviours after-the-fact, or from thousands of kilometres away. This is important because one of the most interesting attributes of Beesley’s works is the way in which they respond to the physical environments in which they are situated. The space in which any work of art is installed will shape it physically and situate it contextually over the course of its lifespan; but Hylozoic Soil physically responds to individual users engaging it through a network of whiskers and fronds, altering its overall systemic behaviour in response to the sum of those interactions over time.

While a work of architecture that responds to user interaction is amazing enough, that response is really only as good as the emotions it evokes. Over lunch one day, Gorbet and I discussed the work of Paul Ekman; which suggests that although physical expressions are tied to a diversity of underlying emotions across human cultures, a few basic emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) are associated with certain facial expressions almost universally. In order to convey emotional expressions outside of that basic set in high-tech installations, work is underway at PBAI to motion capture Beesley’s physical interpretations of concepts like grace, and elegance. By capturing and quantifying the architect’s various physical expressions of an emotion, behaviours can be designed and uploaded to his installations that, while not necessarily universally understandable, bring the pieces to life in new and exciting ways.

Sargasso and development on the Hylozoic Series

After engaging Beesley and Gorbet in conversation, and spending an afternoon at the PBAI studio in Toronto’s west end, I felt as though I’d had my mind opened up in a dozen new directions… but once I sat down to write this piece, I began to wonder why these thinkers’ astute reflections on technique and motivation seemed so familiar to me. I realized that it was because “good” experimental architecture and “good” digital storytelling have more in common than I’d assumed: risky collaborations between creative types from different fields seem to be behind the most interesting works in both realms. So do deep conceptual and technical investigations into the quantification and translation of emotional experience. Same with the design of new tools for concocting and measuring meaningful interaction.

I thought back to a conversation I’d had with Philip Beesley about his work, and how he’d tackled the creation of something emphatically new and experimental that would nonetheless need to resonate with audiences lacking a formal context for approaching it – a potential problem for architects and interactive storytellers alike. His feeling was that art culture, with its exclusive and sophisticated knowledge; is often positioned against mass culture, seen as having brutal or reductive qualities… but that this need not be the case. Beesley’s philosophy is that the appeal of collective experience runs so deep that perhaps the primary pursuit of creators across cultural, critical, and formal boundaries should be collective delight. Curiosity as inseparable from interconnection. Life as inseparable from matter.

Trevor Haldenby is an interactive producer and photographer living in Toronto. He has attended Wilfrid Laurier University, Rhode Island School of Design, CFC Media Lab, and is presently completing a Master’s of Design in Strategic Foresight & Innovation at OCAD University.
@trevverwww.longexposure.cawww.zed.to

AntiVJ at MUTEK: Projection mapping masters talk up unconventional visuals and running a “visual label”

Murcof + AntiVJ texture

Continuing our MUTEK interview series, we talk to AntiVJ artist Joanie Lemercier and producer Nicolas Boritch about their approach to mind-bending projected music visuals, their evolution from nightclub VJing to producing large-scale artistic collaborations, and their approach to working as a “visual label.”

Since 2005, AntiVJ has had a resounding influence on visuals in dance clubs, live music performance, and installations. Though they pioneered and perfected the usage of projection mapping – wherein carefully-aligned digital projections create illusions on unconventional surfaces – AntiVJ pledges allegiance to no technique, only a focus “on the use of projected light and its influence on our perception.”

Read More »

Amon Tobin premieres ISAM at MUTEK

Greetings! I’m Aylwin Lo, CFC Media Lab’s newest staff addition. As a Tech Coordinator, I provide technical and design support to many of the Media Lab’s exciting activities. Last week I took a trip out of the lab to attend the 12th edition of MUTEK, Montreal’s prestigious and groundbreaking festival for electronic music and digital art.

As in previous years, this year’s MUTEK promised an array of acts ranging from seasoned acts premiering their latest audio-visual work to up-and-comers making a break for it. One of our own current residents, Laurel McDonald, has performed at MUTEK and was recently featured on their website for her performance project combining vocals and visuals, Videovoce.

It was my privilege to be able to interview four of the acts performing at this year’s festival. We’ll be posting roughly an interview a week until they’re all up. Be sure to visit Stabletalk once a week if you aren’t already subscribed to our RSS feed or email updates.

Read More »

Becoming What We Behold: A CFC Media Lab Project

Becoming What We Behold

Creative & Technical Team: Pearl Chen, Meagan Durlak, Matthew Fabb, Priam Givord, Brandon Hocura, Ana Serrano

Marshall McLuhan’s idea that “we shape our tools and then our tools shape us” has particular relevance to the way social media has defined the 21st century. From Facebook to Flickr, these applications evolve, give form, and satisfy our insatiable appetite to share subjective experience. This interactive installation features a geometric configuration of wall-mounted tablet computers in the atrium of the TIFF Bell Lightbox that brings together user-generated content. The viewer becomes an active participant in the work, as they upload images, curate, and share personal imagery.  Becoming What We Behold uses the language of cinema–fades, dissolves, wipes, freeze-frames, and moving images–to create narratives from the digital aggregate of our lives.

As the installation shifts between figure and ground, the viewer gains a real-time portrait of the individual and the social systems that underlie contemporary culture. The story is not so much about a single person; rather, it reveals the interconnectedness of lives that are mediated through a field of common experience.

Becoming What We Behold will be on display at the TIFF Bell Lightbox (350 King Street West) as part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival from May 11–29; 10am to 10pm.

CFC Media Lab Presents CLOSE ENCOUNTERS @ InterAccess Gallery

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS:

On Thursday, September 29, 2010, CFC Media Lab launched the prototypes created by Residents from the Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 sessions of the TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program.

On Saturday, October 2, 2010, these prototypes were exhibited for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010 at InterAccess Gallery.

CFC Media Lab Presents: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

A night of "Exploratory Play"...

"Exploratory Play"... IN 3D!

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010 Exhibit: Zone C #19

Neighbourhoodie, Created By: Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie, David McCallum

Unit N-O14, Created By: Camille Betts, Justin Ferrato

DruMeBa, Created By: Dee Balkissoon, Cathy Chen, Orla Garriques, Conor Holler

Voicings, Created By: Dawn Buie, Liz Gallo, David Goorevitch

I Should Be Dreaming of Butterflies, Created By: Sharon Switzer, Featured Alumni Artist

A good-lookin' crowd being addressed by our fearless leaders...

Slawko Klymkiw, CFC Executive Director

Ana Serrano, CFC Media Lab Director

Jacqueline Nuwame, CFC Media Lab Senior Training Programs Manager

And what party is a party without decadent food!

A great big THANK YOU to everyone who made the night such a success!

For more photos…

Click here for more photos from the CFC Media Lab VIP Launch at InterAccess Gallery: picasaweb.google.com/113229431714491281154/CFCMediaLabPresentsCLOSEENCOUNTERS#

or check out our Flickr page here: www.flickr.com/photos/cfcmedialab

GREAT THANKS to our fabulous photographer, Trevor Haldenby: www.longexposure.ca

CFC Media Lab Exhibition 2010: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

THANK YOU to everyone who came out and made last night’s VIP Launch such a success!

Make sure InterAccess Gallery (9 Ossington Ave.) is a stop on your route for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010!

Here is a preview of what’s there to explore!

I Should Be Dreaming of ButterfliesBy: Sharon Switzer
Voicings -
By: Dawn Buie, Liz Gallo, David Goorevitch
DruMeBa
By: Dee Balkissoon, Cathy Chen, Orla Garriques, Conor Holler
Neighbourhoodie -
By: Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie, David McCallum
Unit N-O14 -
By: Camille Betts, Justin Ferrato

CFC Media Lab at 01 San Jose: A Great Success!

The 2010 01SJ Biennial (ZER01, San Jose) was a great success thanks to CFC Media Lab Alumni David McCallum, Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie, Sharon Switzer, Angella Mackey, and Pearl Chen as well as CFC Media Lab Operations Manager, Leonardo Dell’Anno.

This festival is predicated on the notion that as artists, designers, engineers, architects, marketers, corporations and citizens we have the tools to (re)build the world, conceptually and actually, virtually and physically, poorly and better, aesthetically and pragmatically, in both large and small ways.

Under the theme “Build Your Own World,” the CFC Media Lab led a series of workshops where participants made their Hoodie “zombie-tag” ready for a widespread, participatory game:

The making of…

01SJ Hoodie Play Workshop
01SJ Hoodie Play Workshop01SJ Hoodie Play Workshop

Project Hoodie Play is based on a wearable game by Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie and David McCallum created during their residency at CFC Media Lab’s TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program. (Special shout out goes to Kate Hartman, CFC Media Lab guest faculty for helping us design the workshop!)

Check out Project Hoodie Play in ACTION:

Also at 01SJ, CFC Media Lab and Art for Commuters founder, Sharon Switzer presented the “Best Of” works from the Art For Commuters library that speak to the theme of conscious creation.

Take a peek at the “Best Of” works here:

Also at 01SJ was Luke Jerram’s “Play Me I’m Yours” an installation in which 19 street pianos appeared on the streets of San Jose, CA (www.01sjpiano.com). Located in public parks, streets and squares, the pianos were for any member of the public to play and enjoy. This project was about enlivening the urban space and the community in places you would least expect it.

Check out the music video below featuring Canadian Jazz Artist, Ori Dagan (Produced by CFC Media Lab and Leonardo Dell’Anno):

CONGRATS TO ALL!

I can hardly wait to see Project Hoodie Play in action on Toronto’s streets this Saturday during Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010.

So you think you’re the fastest Zombie in Toronto? PROVE IT! Make InterAccess Gallery (9 Ossington Ave.) a stop on your Nuit Blanche route and sign-up for a game of Zombie tag at 9pm, 12am, or 3am.

Come out and bring me coffee PLAY!

Musings from the mountains…


September 9, 2010

Dear Friends,

I hope this letter finds everyone well, rested from a glorious summer, eager to embrace fall, and ready to rock n’ roll through to the rest of 2010. This August I was lucky to have spent some time in the mountains of the French High Alps at a place called Les Terraces, above the small alpine village La Grave — that’s The Grave to you. The place feels totally different from Banff, — less wilderness-y, though still wild, and feels more like a portal into the 12th century.

Here’s a picture taken from one of our walks!

Now, given what you see here, you’d think the mountains would keep thoughts of work at bay. But I must admit I would often think of the Lab. Before you groan and mutter “crazyworkaholic” let me explain.

MY TOP FIVE REASONS WHY IT WAS OKAY TO THINK OF THE CFC MEDIA LAB in the FRENCH ALPS:

  1. Galen Scorer, former CFC Media Lab Research & Tech Manager is sleeping on my couch as we rush to premiere our new interactive production! Alum, Patrick Dinnen is part of the team building this exciting new work.

    CFC Media Lab in co-production with TIFF, will be launching an installation entitled What’s Your Essential Cinema?on Saturday Sept. 11 at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

    As you enter TIFF Bell Lightbox, you will encounter an interactive projection above the box office: a dynamic visualization of kinetic images from each of the Essential 100 Films. Text in “your essential cinema” — one film from the Essential 100. The system takes note of it and adds it to every other person’s choice. The projected visualization then changes as the difference between what you think and what TIFF thinks is displayed on the screen. “What’s Your Essential Cinema?” pits the general public against the experts and puts you at the center of the conversation.

    A CFC Media Lab and TIFF Production
    Creative team: Ana Serrano, Galen Scorer and Patrick Dinnen
    September 12 – October 23

  2. Alumni David McCallum, Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie, Sharon Switzer, Angella Mackey, & Pearl Chen are currently rocking out (in spirit and in person) in California under the helm of Leonardo Dell’Anno!

    CFC Media Lab launches Project HoodiePlay and Let’s Build Our World Intentionally at 2010 01SJ Biennial.

    The 2010 01SJ (ZER01, San Jose) Biennial is predicated on the notion that as artists, designers, engineers, architects, marketers, corporations and citizens we have the tools to (re)build the world, conceptually and actually, virtually and physically, poorly and better, aesthetically and pragmatically, in both large and small ways.

    Under the theme “Build Your Own World,” the CFC Media Lab will be leading a series of workshops where participants can make their Hoodie “zombie-tag” ready for a widespread, participatory game. There won’t be cut throat competition. And Heidi Klum won’t show up. But you will get to make your own signature “wearable Hoodie” that enables you to play Zombie Tag during the AbsoluteZER0 street festival on Friday, September 17. Project HoodiePlay is based on a wearable game by Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie and David McCallum created during their residency at CFC Media Lab’s TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program.

    Special shout out goes to Kate Hartman, CFC Media Lab guest faculty for helping us design the workshop!

    CFC Media Lab and Art for Commuters founder, Sharon Switzer will also present the “Best Of” works from the Art For Commuters library that speak to the theme of conscious creation. Screenings will happen during 01SJ as part of the Future Films program.

  3. Nuit Blanche is almost upon us and we have a launch to prepare for Oct. 2nd! CFC Media Lab IAEP Coordinator Kimberly Dean, while not running stabletalk, is helping fearless leader Jacqueline Nuwame make this happen at our new venue partner InterAccess!

    At this year’s Scotiabank Nuit Blanche the CFC Media Lab will present Close Encounters, an annual exhibition of work by residents of the TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program. These interactive media projects run the gamut from interactive sound pieces to iPhone wearable gaming systems. From those which explore notions of first contact, to others which invite us to reimagine play. Regardless of technology platform or theme, each of these projects makes us look at things a different way. Shaving cream, pillows, mud – they can all become vehicles for our persistent visions. The gallery will be transformed into a space for inquisitive discovery and play. Created by: Dee Balkissoon, Camille Betts, Rose Bianchini, Dawn Buie, Cathy Chen, Kathleen Climie, Justin Ferrato, Liz Gallo, Orla Garriques, David Goorevitch, Conor Holler, David McCallum and featured Alumni Artist, Sharon Switzer.

    Location: InterAccess Gallery (9 Ossington Ave. Toronto)
    VIP Launch (Invite Only): September 30 from 7-10pm
    Open to Public: October 2 from 7pm-7am

  4. Prototype Launch? Hell ya, we can do more!  So, CFC Media Lab Digital Production Manager, Steve Ferguson and our new Research and Technology Manager, Dave Kretz are working alongside our new partners the Royal Conservatory of Music to create a whole new work for Nuit Blanche.

    Commissioned by TELUS, Musical Rumble: Jazz vs Classical, is an interactive experience where larger-than-life musicians are projected onto the TELUS Centre windows while audiences use their smartphones to play a virtual game where jazz and classical musicians battle for your vote. Stop by the Bloor Street courtyard of the TELUS Centre (273 Bloor Street West, Toronto) on October 2nd from 7pm-7am to see, hear and interact with the projected performances!

    and last, but not least,

  5. Jacqueline Nuwame, CFC Media Lab Senior Programs Manager, has redefined multitasking as she helps me keep all of the above running smoothly while ushering a new group of residents for the Fall 2010 TELUS IAEP session!

    The average age of this group is sweet-thirty and boasts the following stellar individuals:

    Ryan Bigge
    is a Toronto-based freelance journalist and content strategist with a focus on technology and cultural trends. His publication credits include the New York Times Magazine and the Toronto Star.

    Edwin Lara
    is a digital artist whose recent work was on display at the Launch Projects art gallery for the “Do Artist Dream of Electric Easels” exhibition. Edwin’s studies include everything from graphic design, marketing to art history.

    Dylan Reibling hails from a small rural community in southwestern Ontario. He makes documentaries, narrratives, and experimental films and organizes events and art installations.

    Vanessa Shaver is an award-winning writer and filmmaker who possesses a passion for story well-told, character well-wrought and concept well-formed. Vanessa has worked with Shaftesbury Films, Henry Less Productions, ImagiNation Film and Television, marblemedia and Big Studios.

    Bobie Taffe is an independent interactive cross platform Producer. Her production company, Taffe Entertainment, produces feature films/documentaries/dramatic series/lifestyle programs that focus on exploring issues of race, sexuality, self-image, multiculturalism and social justice. Bobie has been actively working in the Canadian Film and Television Industry for a little more than a decade.

    Ron Wild worked in traditional Civil / Structural disciplines before earning an MBA from the University of Western Ontario. Ron managed small hi-tech venture companies for over 15 years before transitioning into creating and exhibiting digital art.

    Tsu-Ching Yu with a Bachelor’s degree in computer science and diploma in digital media at the Recording Arts Canada Digital Arts College, is a lyric coloratura soprano. She is also an ACTRA stunt performer for film and television who trains in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

I was thinking of listing my Top 10 Reasons…but got tired after five. (Now I see why I may have needed to climb almost 15,782 ft to get away from it all.) But the reality is that I wasn’t letting thoughts of work destroy my zen mountain moments: I thought about the team of staff, alumni, faculty and former colleagues of CFC Media Lab because I was in awe of how much amazing work they are doing. (Notice I didn’t even mention any of the other work our esteemed community has been building within their own corporations and practice! Way to go Caitlin! Woo hoo Gorbets for the San Jose Airport! Congrats, Martha, on finishing up your comprehensives! Dare I go on?)

And as many of you know, there are another five projects lurking around the corner ready to be announced after we get through the 01SJ/TIFF/NUIT Blanche triage.

So here I am sitting in a dusty hallway of the new Bell Lightbox, high from sleep-deprivation, copying and pasting text into the Max Patch for Galen.  The plug behind me does not work, my black skirt is now drywall white, and sure I miss the mountains. But I’m really excited about this Fall and seeing everyone this weekend for our annual BBQ.

Namaste to all,

Ana

Call for Proposals: HTMlles Festival of Media Art + Digital Culture 2010, Montreal

homeland

Calling all talented femmes!

The HTMlles Festival of Media Art + Digital Culture 2010 (htmlles.net) is currently seeking proposals for its 9th edition, to be held in Montreal, under the theme of <home></land>.

Initiated by Studio XX (www.studioxx.org) in 1997, and evolving as quickly as technology itself, the HTMlles Festival is an international platform dedicated to the presentation of women’s independent media artworks from all facets of contemporary technological creation, including but not limited to:

  • digital storytelling
  • cyber art
  • short film and video art
  • audio and electronic art
  • installation
  • locative media
  • 3D animation
  • game art
  • virtual reality
  • electronic publishing
  • design
  • performance
  • interdisciplinary practices

As a meeting place at the crossroads of creativity, technology and a wide spectrum of feminist perspectives, the HTMlles Festival focuses on the public presentation of innovative media artworks, panel discussions and workshops, creating dynamic connections between audiences, artists, cultural practitioners, curators, producers, educators, scholars, students and technophiles.

The Deets!

THE WHEN: November 13 – 20, 2010
THE WHERE: Montreal, QC

THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS: Monday, September 13, 2010 (9:00 PM)
Check out the Submission Guidelines here: htmlles.net/2010/en/callforproposals.html

Prototype from CFC Media Lab’s TELUS IAEP Featured on MaRS Website

“Voicings” – Dawn Buie from MaRS Discovery District on Vimeo.

AntiVJ at MUTEK: Projection mapping masters talk up unconventional visuals and running a “visual label”

Continuing our MUTEK interview series, we talk to AntiVJ artist Joanie Lemercier and producer Nicolas Boritch about their approach to mind-bending projected music visuals, their evolution from nightclub VJing to producing large-scale artistic collaborations, and their approach to working as a “visual label.” Since 2005, AntiVJ has had a resounding influence on visuals in dance […]

Amon Tobin premieres ISAM at MUTEK

Greetings! I’m Aylwin Lo, CFC Media Lab’s newest staff addition. As a Tech Coordinator, I provide technical and design support to many of the Media Lab’s exciting activities. Last week I took a trip out of the lab to attend the 12th edition of MUTEK, Montreal’s prestigious and groundbreaking festival for electronic music and digital […]

Becoming What We Behold: A CFC Media Lab Project

Becoming What We Behold Creative & Technical Team: Pearl Chen, Meagan Durlak, Matthew Fabb, Priam Givord, Brandon Hocura, Ana Serrano Marshall McLuhan’s idea that “we shape our tools and then our tools shape us” has particular relevance to the way social media has defined the 21st century. From Facebook to Flickr, these applications evolve, give […]

CFC Media Lab Presents CLOSE ENCOUNTERS @ InterAccess Gallery

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS: On Thursday, September 29, 2010, CFC Media Lab launched the prototypes created by Residents from the Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 sessions of the TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program. On Saturday, October 2, 2010, these prototypes were exhibited for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010 at InterAccess Gallery. A great big THANK YOU to […]

CFC Media Lab Exhibition 2010: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

THANK YOU to everyone who came out and made last night’s VIP Launch such a success! Make sure InterAccess Gallery (9 Ossington Ave.) is a stop on your route for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche 2010! Here is a preview of what’s there to explore! I Should Be Dreaming of Butterflies – By: Sharon Switzer Voicings – […]

CFC Media Lab at 01 San Jose: A Great Success!

The 2010 01SJ Biennial (ZER01, San Jose) was a great success thanks to CFC Media Lab Alumni David McCallum, Rose Bianchini, Kathleen Climie, Sharon Switzer, Angella Mackey, and Pearl Chen as well as CFC Media Lab Operations Manager, Leonardo Dell’Anno. This festival is predicated on the notion that as artists, designers, engineers, architects, marketers, corporations […]

Musings from the mountains…

September 9, 2010 Dear Friends, I hope this letter finds everyone well, rested from a glorious summer, eager to embrace fall, and ready to rock n’ roll through to the rest of 2010. This August I was lucky to have spent some time in the mountains of the French High Alps at a place called […]

Call for Proposals: HTMlles Festival of Media Art + Digital Culture 2010, Montreal

Calling all talented femmes! The HTMlles Festival of Media Art + Digital Culture 2010 (htmlles.net) is currently seeking proposals for its 9th edition, to be held in Montreal, under the theme of <home></land>. Initiated by Studio XX (www.studioxx.org) in 1997, and evolving as quickly as technology itself, the HTMlles Festival is an international platform dedicated […]

Prototype from CFC Media Lab’s TELUS IAEP Featured on MaRS Website

“Voicings” – Dawn Buie from MaRS Discovery District on Vimeo.

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